The researchers found that that sad music has a counterintuitive appeal – it actually makes people feel better. Sad songs allow listeners to experience indirectly the emotions expressed in the lyrics and implied by the (usually) minor-key melodies. The sadness may not directly reflect the listener’s own experiences, but it triggers chemicals in our brain that can produce a cathartic response: tears, chills, an elevated heartbeat. This is not an unpleasant feeling, and may explain why listeners are inclined to buy sad songs and why artists want to write or sing them.
Reblogged from Explore
Your life has thus far been defined by idiots.
Reblogged from this isn't happiness.
artpropelled:

Stacked Nests by Mary Jo Hoffman

artpropelled:

Stacked Nests by Mary Jo Hoffman

Reblogged from CUBICLE REFUGEE
All we really want in life is someone who can make us feel like we’re not crazy.
— what I’m learning recently (via theohpioneer)
Reblogged from Oh, Pioneer!
Reblogged from Oh, Pioneer!